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Marrakech City Tour

 

Discover the top Marrakech attractions. Don't miss the best places to visit in the city.

Menara Gardens

Menara Gardens

This inner-city garden is a bubble of serenity hidden right in the heart of Marrakesh. It's a local-favorite spot for getting out of the hustle to enjoy some peace and quiet. The large pool in the center of the garden has a fine pavilion, built on the water's edge in the late 19th century. For many local Marrakesh families the Manara Gardens are picnicking central and on the weekend it can be a great place to witness local family life. Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Menara Gardens

Majorelle Gardens

Majorelle Gardens

These lush tropical gardens, full of cacti, palms and ferns, are the work of painter Jacques Majorelle. Originally from the town of Nancy in France, Majorelle came to Marrakesh for health reasons and became well known for his paintings of local Moroccan life. His most famous work though was this garden and the vibrant blue (the colour now known as Majorelle blue) painter's studio he lived in on the grounds. After Majorelle's death in 1962, French fashion designer Yves St Laurent bought the property and upon his death in 2008, his ashes were scattered in the gardens. A small pavilion on site has a small but interesting collection of Islamic art. Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Majorelle Gardens

Ben Youssef Madrassa

Ben Youssef Madrassa

Built in 1565 by the Saadians, the Medersa (madrassa - Islamic school of learning) of Ben Youssef is the largest theological college in Morocco. The warrens of rooms (with student cells which once were home to 900 pupils) are clustered around small internal courtyards in typical Islamic architecture style. The fine zellige tiling, stalactite ceilings and Kufic inscriptions used as decoration across much of the building interior are the highlights of a visit to this Medina attraction.  Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Ben Youssef Madrassa

Mellah

Mellah

The Mellah in Marrakech refers to the area where Jews resided. Living in their own separate quarter meant that they were protected in the Kasbah walls, more easily watched and sure enough, taxed by the government. If you’d like to explore the Mellah, then you can enter through the Place des Ferblantiers, which was once referred to as the Place de Mellah. If you are having a hard time finding the area, look for the tin workers who now line the outer edge of the square souk. In this area, you’ll also be able to visit Place Souweka, which is a fountain that marks the center of the quarters. Source: morocco.com

How to get to: Mellah

Koutoubia Mosque

Koutoubia Mosque

The Koutoubia Mosque is Marrakesh's most famous landmark with its striking, 70 m tall minaret visible for miles in every direction. Local Marrakesh legend tells that when first built it, the muezzin (man who calls the faithful to pray) for this mosque had to be blind as the minaret was so tall that it overlooked the ruler's harem. The mosque was built in 1162 and is one of the great achievements of Almohad architecture. Non-Muslims are not allowed into the prayer hall. Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Koutoubia Mosque

Badii Palace

Badii Palace

This magnificent peacock of a palace was built in the 19th century as the residence of the Grand Vizier Bou Ahmed, who served Sultan Moulay al-Hassan I. The interior decoration is a dazzling display of zellige tiles, painted ceilings and ornate wrought-iron features showcasing the opulent lives of those high-up in the sultan's favour at that time. The palace is surrounded by sumptuous flower and tree-filled gardens. Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Badii Palace

Palm Grove

Palm Grove

The Marrakech palm grove, the country's northernmost, counts almost 100 000 trees today. But its splendour of old is no more. Most of the rhettaras (irrigation channels) being exhausted, drought threatens what used to be a huge tropical garden. An ambitious project to introduce 300 000 plants was initiated, but it does not manage to mask the balding palms, which have become the backdrop of a top-notch urbanisation process. Rides in horse-drawn carriages. Source: travel.michelin.com

How to get to: Palm Grove

Djemaa El Fna

Djemaa El Fna

This large square at the entry to the Medina is the centre of Marrakesh life. The Djemaa El Fna (assembly place of the nobodies) is a vibrant hub of bric-a-brac stalls, musicians, storytellers, fortune-tellers and snake charmers that never seems to rest. Here the entire spectrum of Moroccan life enfolds before you. If being down among the thrum becomes too much, it's also easy to escape to one of the many surrounding rooftop cafes and restaurants where you can survey the crazy scene from above. Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Jemma El Fna

Saadian Tombs

Saadian Tombs

This 16th century burial ground is home to 66 members of the Saadian dynasty, which ruled over Marrakesh between 1524 and 1668. The tombs here include that of the ruler Al-Mansour, his successors and their closest family members. It's a rambling, atmospheric place with the mausoleums set amid a rather overgrown garden. In particular, the main mausoleum (where Moulay Yazid is buried) has a fine surviving mihrab (prayer niche). Source: planetware.com

How to get to: Saadian Tombs

Souk

Souk

Here you can see Moroccan craftsmanship in all its diversity, organised by profession. Stroll through the crowds under a roof of reeds, passing craftsmen and tradesmen hawking leather goods, fabrics, kettles and pottery. The Dyers' Souk, perhaps the most striking of all, has skeins of multicoloured wool hanging out to dry on its walls, while the Blacksmiths' Souk (souk Haddadine) has every possible article of metalwork on display! The souks of Marrakech are truly an institution. Source: travel.michelin.com

How to get to: Souk